Germany, Land of Immigration

Germany, Land of Immigration

Report from the Commission "Perspectives for a Forward-Looking and Sustainable Refugee and Immigration Policy"
Cover: Germany, Land of Immigration
Dec 18, 2018
Heinrich Böll Foundation
Place of Publication: Berlin
Date of Publication: November 2018
Number of Pages: 89
License: CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0

According to the United Nations, right now there are 68.5 million refugees in the world seeking safety from war, persecution, and oppression, whether inside or outside the borders of their own country. Although the number of those seeking protection in Germany is relatively small by international standards, in recent years it has risen steadily in the Federal Republic. Over the course of these developments, the question has arisen as to what the content of a sustainable and forward-looking immigration policy would look like, and which institutions should be involved.

Against this background, the Heinrich Böll Foundation set up a commission in late 2015, “Perspectives for a Forward-Looking and Sustainable Refugee and Immigration Policy”. The present e-paper presents international perspectives that build on these ideas for the purpose of preventing flight and controlling migration. They expand on the institutional aspect of a whole-of-government approach, the formulation of the UNHCRʼs approach to resettlement, and a humane and transparent return policy.​

Table of contents:

Introduction

INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE WHOLE-OF-GOVERNMENT APPROACH

  1. Elements of a coherent German foreign policy on refugees and migration 
  2. Introduction
  3. Pressure to act: Mixed migrations, persistent refugee crises
  4. International and European framework conditions
  5.  Challenges and fields of action
  6. Options within German policy action areas
  7. Elements of a foreign policy on migration
  8. Summary 

ACTIVE RECEPTION OF ASYLUM SEEKERS AS AN ORGANISATIONAL TOOL OF REFUGEE POLICY

  1. Introduction
  2. Refugee politics in context
  3. Reactions in refugee policy
  4. The active reception of refugees as a means of shaping policy
  5. The active reception of refugees from third countries 
  6. The resettlement process and the whole-of-government approach
  7. Concluding remarks: On the relationship between the human right to asylum and the instrument of resettlement
  8. Recommendations for action

POTENTIAL FOR RETURN POLICY REFORM: MAKE PROCESSES TRANSPARENT, EMPHASISE HUMANITARIAN CONDUCT, BOLSTER VOLUNTARY RETURNS 

  1. Introduction
  2. Background: A quick look at numbers, data, and facts
  3. Framework conditions: Human dignity and the protection of fundamental rights as a guideline
  4. Requirements for termination of residence: EU law and national standards
  5. Continuation of residence: Remaining despite rejection of the application for asylum
  6. Back to the country of origin: Deportation
  7. Changes in legislation: Stricter enforcement of the obligation to depart
  8. Voluntary return before deportation? Current practice in return counselling and termination of residence
  9. Recommendations for action: Make use of the potential for reform 

The Author(s) 

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