Multilateralism

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Shaping the Future of Multilateralism - Feminist, Decolonial Economic Solutions to Address Interconnected Global Crises

Published: 20 May 2021
E-paper

The undeniable connections among the multiple crises that humanity faces today -- climate change, biodiversity loss, inequality, poverty, and the Covid-19 pandemic -- demand interconnected, rather than segmented, macro solutions. Responses must be systemic and address the structural dynamics and shortcomings of governance, economics and finance. A feminist and decolonial framing provides a lens for proposed reforms.

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Shaping the Future of Multilateralism - Biometrics in Belgrade: Serbia’s Path Shows Broader Dangers of Surveillance State

Published: 19 May 2021
E-paper

On the EU’s periphery, Serbia has deployed enough biometric surveillance technology from China’s Huawei for law enforcement and “Safe City” solutions to cover practically all of Belgrade’s public spaces. Public pressure has raised the bar for turning on the technology, but the alarming project illustrates the need for transparent regulation of such systems everywhere, to ensure the protection of fundamental human rights.

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Shaping the Future of Multilateralism - Digital trade rules: Big Tech’s end run around domestic regulations

Published: 19 May 2021
E-paper

Trade agreements have become an important battleground for tech companies to fight the regulatory pressure they are finally facing in the Global North. But allowing tech companies to capture digital trade talks to defang domestic regulation creates serious risks for privacy, fundamental rights, competition, social and economic justice, and sustainable development.

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Shaping the Future of Multilateralism - Mobilizing resources urgently for climate action: overcoming longstanding challenges and learning from Covid-19

Published: 19 May 2021
E-paper

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that countries can marshal significant resources quickly and at scale in an emergency. The climate crisis requires no less. First and foremost, that means resolving longstanding issues of climate finance -- definitional disputes, access to financing, the obstacle of indebtedness, and underneath them all, trust that rich nations will deliver on their outstanding and new climate finance commitments. Only then can the international system ensure that the poorest and most vulnerable people, communities, and countries can make the necessary changes the whole world needs.