Event Report European Union

English

2016 was the year the fissures in the structure of the EU became visible even for those who had preferred to ignore them. We asked three experts what the three most serious challenges are.

After the ‘Leave’ vote in last June’s Brexit referendum, the European Union is shaking on its foundations. Our office invited young Europeans to debate about the Europe they want with EU veterans, Members of the European Parliament, EU experts from think tanks and representatives of civil society.

The EU-Turkey refugee deal attracted much criticism. This paper discusses whether the deal can be considered as a success or a sell out on European values, taking its impacts on migration flows, the EU asylum law and the European Convention on Human Rights into consideration.

On 21 June 2016, the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung European Union hosted a 'Workshop for the Future' for young Europeans. Questions such as how to deal with the after effects of the Paris and Brussels attacks and the fear and insecurity they have caused among the young have been raised and discussed.

Only three months after the devastating terrorist attacks in Brussels, a strange silence has fallen over Europe. Terrorism has disappeared from the headlines; think tanks and politicians have found other subjects to focus on but many questions remain.

The majority of the Scottish, including the leading Scottish National Party, are in favor of EU membership. The results of the Brexit referendum could result in a discrepancy between the Scottish wish to remain and the possible UK-wide wish to "Brexit".

A new ‘trilogy’ of referendums started with the Danish European Union opt-out referendum in December 2015, followed by the Dutch Ukraine-referendum in April and Brexit coming up in June. Paired with the recent terror attacks and the still ongoing refugee crisis, what does this mean for the future of the European Union? Is there still hope for a multi-cultural unified Europe?

More than 1 million asylum seekers arrived in Europe last year. The situation overwhelmed national governments and EU Institutions alike and further disrupted the relations between Member States.

On 1 January 2016 the Netherlands embarked on what will probably turn out to be the rockiest of its twelve EU Council Presidencies.

From October 12 – 16 2015, the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung European Union hosted a capacity building for 16 young Europeans from France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Sweden and the UK. The aim was to give the participants the possibility to compare the right-wing movements in their respective countries of origin and to jointly develop policies to combat this disquieting trend.

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